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WordPress translation

As most of you know, I am Dutch. But as I have a lot of English language clients, I started out with an English website. Most Dutch people are fluent in English so that seemed the logical choice

Yet I wanted to do something in my own language as well. This is not something that is not build into WordPress, you will have to find your own solution. Like with most things there are plugins that will allow you to have more languages on your website.

I tried some free plugins first, but they did not perform as I wanted them to and the search continued. That is when I came across the WPML plugin. Not a free one but the options looked good. I had a look at the demo video and saw that the theme I am using on WordPress, Nevada, was supported. After thinking about it for a while I decided to take the plunge and install it.

As I am really not technical it took me a frustrating afternoon to get things set up as I wanted them. And then another week to translate the pages that I wanted translated. [I had done the text translations beforehand] This meant, setting up the links between pages again, inserting images, making a new Dutch menu.

It looks good now. Not all pages have been translated. Some I will do over the coming months, some not at all, like my blog. That is too much work. In the images below you can see the difference between the Dutch and English menu. If you want to see the other pages you have to switch back to English.

vertaling 2

vertaling 3

Right now there are three places where you can switch languages. I have shown one in the image below.

vertaling 1

They are:

  • The top of the header
  • Sidebar
  • Footer

Really happy now. And a large range of translations are available! You can even hire people to translate your pages for you. Not something I would use as I think your own voice should shine through.

 

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